improve:

 

Information on how to: train supply chains on human and labor rights and risks for workers, and engage in collaborative efforts to systematically make improvements

Action:

Build capacity to implement best practices

STEP 1:
Train throughout the supply chain

BUYER STEPS:

  • Train CEOs, directors, and buyers on risks.

  • Train suppliers (including beyond first tier) in company supply chains on expectations and implementation of due diligence mechanisms, applicable legal and regulatory requirements, and data collection processes that can help identify areas of supply chains with the greatest risks.

  • Offer suppliers information, education, guidance to help raise supplier awareness, recognition, and correction of issues.

 

 

EMPLOYER STEPS: 

  • Train supervisors, workers, and other relevant staff in social compliance, including: applicable legal and regulatory requirements, data collection processes, workplace rights, and company grievance and remediation policies.

  • Train subcontractors on expectations and implementation of due diligence mechanisms, applicable legal and regulatory requirements, and data collection processes that can help identify areas of supply chains with the greatest risks.

 

supporting guidance
Training
  • Successfully fulfilling social responsibility commitments requires that all participants along supply chains, from brand and retail CEOs to seafood workers, are aware of human and labor rights risks, responsibilities, and rights.
 
  • Awareness building and training helps to communicate company social responsibility goals throughout supply chains and ensure that they are translated into practice for workers.
  • Training and education allows violations to be more quickly identified and reported, and increases employee and supplier motivation to implement best practices.
Screenshot 2019-03-12 17.49.07.png
STEP 2: 
Engage in collaborative efforts to systematically make improvements

BUYER STEPS:

  • Participate in collaborative initiatives with other stakeholders including companies, trade unions, government agencies, NGOs/CSOs, and others. 

  • Institute an iterative and ongoing process of stakeholder engagement, identifying opportunities for collective action with other companies, trade unions, government agencies, NGOs, and multi-stakeholder initiatives. These activities provide companies educational, outreach, and stakeholder engagement opportunities to learn from and dialogue with stakeholders across fields. 

  • Advocate for public policy change by engaging with governments to promote regulations, conventions, and other legal frameworks that protect human and labor rights.

 

 

EMPLOYER STEPS: 

  • Partner with and support local and civil society organizations that protect and advocate for workers' rights.

  • Explore the RISE referral hub to learn about local civil social organizations working on the ground that can help to engage in improvements.

  • Support government initiatives and international agreements that promote best practices for social responsibility in global supply chains.

Helpful resources:

In-person and virtual trainings

Written guidance on training

supporting guidance
Get connected:  Join a multi-stakeholder initiative to drive social responsibility
Collaboration with industry leaders, government agencies, NGOs, business partners, human rights experts, and trade unions can help companies reach greater levels of impact by sharing costs, increase supply chain leverage, and address complex issues pre-competitively. Engagement can take many forms, described below.

 

While a collaborative model to address challenges is beginning to gain traction within the seafood industry, it has already proven effective in the conflict minerals and apparel sectors. For example, the Conflict Free Smelter Initiative was successful in empowering the minerals sector to implement risk-based due diligence. In addition, the Social and Labor Convergence Project brings together global retailers and NGOs to improve working conditions in the global apparel and footwear sectors.

Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 10.49.54 AM.pn
The Seafood Task Force (Task Force)
 
The Task Force is a group of seafood processors, feed producers, buyers, retailers, government representatives and NGOs who have come together to address issues surrounding labor and illegal fishing in seafood supply chains currently focusing on the seas around Thailand.
The Responsible Labor Initiative (RLI)

RLI is a multi-industry, multi-stakeholder initiative focused on ensuring that the rights of workers vulnerable to forced labor in global supply chains are consistently respected and promoted.

 

The Initiative is open to any company that supports the mission and vision of the RLI and whose primary objective in joining the initiative is the implementation of forced labor due diligence in their supply chain.

Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 10.51.18 AM.pn
Screen Shot 2019-03-05 at 4.48.22 PM.png
Unknown-1.jpeg
The Leadership Group for Responsible Recruitment
The Leadership Group for Responsible Recruitment is a collaboration between leading companies and expert organizations to drive positive change in the way that migrant workers are recruited. All members of the Leadership Group are publicly committed to the Employer Pays Principle and its implementation throughout their supply chains. 
Seafish Common Ethics Language Group
The Common Ethics Language Group is a multi-stakeholder group established by Seafish whose aims are to establish a common understanding of ethical issues impacting the seafood supply chain, to communicate the work currently going on to address them, and to agree on a clear agenda for future action.
Unknown-1.jpeg
Consumer Goods Forum (CGFWork in Seafood 
 
CGF members work collectively to implement our Priority Industry Principles in areas and geographies of key concern, starting with the seafood industry in Southeast Asia. The Seafood Outreach group is designed to connect and bridge with existing efforts on seafood to mainstream the principles. CGF holds advocacy and supplier events on the ground in key geographies, Regional Roundtables on Responsible Recruitment, and is collaborating with Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI) to provide a benchmark and recognition tool for social compliance schemes in the seafood sector
supporting guidance
Get connected:  Join a multi-stakeholder initiative to drive social responsibility
Collaboration with industry leaders, government agencies, NGOs, business partners, human rights experts, and trade unions can help companies reach greater levels of impact by sharing costs, increase supply chain leverage, and address complex issues pre-competitively. Engagement can take many forms, described below.

 

While a collaborative model to address challenges is beginning to gain traction within the seafood industry, it has already proven effective in the conflict minerals and apparel sectors. For example, the Conflict Free Smelter Initiative was successful in empowering the minerals sector to implement risk-based due diligence. In addition, the Social and Labor Convergence Project brings together global retailers and NGOs to improve working conditions in the global apparel and footwear sectors.

Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 10.49.54 AM.pn
The Seafood Task Force (Task Force)
 
The Task Force is a group of seafood processors, feed producers, buyers, retailers, government representatives and NGOs who have come together to address issues surrounding labor and illegal fishing in seafood supply chains currently focusing on the seas around Thailand.
The Responsible Labor Initiative (RLI)

RLI is a multi-industry, multi-stakeholder initiative focused on ensuring that the rights of workers vulnerable to forced labor in global supply chains are consistently respected and promoted.

 

The Initiative is open to any company that supports the mission and vision of the RLI and whose primary objective in joining the initiative is the implementation of forced labor due diligence in their supply chain.

Unknown-1.jpeg
Consumer Goods Forum (CGFWork in Seafood 
 
CGF members work collectively to implement our Priority Industry Principles in areas and geographies of key concern, starting with the seafood industry in Southeast Asia. The Seafood Outreach group is designed to connect and bridge with existing efforts on seafood to mainstream the principles. CGF holds advocacy and supplier events on the ground in key geographies, Regional Roundtables on Responsible Recruitment, and is collaborating with Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI) to provide a benchmark and recognition tool for social compliance schemes in the seafood sector
Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 10.51.18 AM.pn
Screen Shot 2019-03-05 at 4.48.22 PM.png
Unknown-1.jpeg
The Leadership Group for Responsible Recruitment
The Leadership Group for Responsible Recruitment is a collaboration between leading companies and expert organizations to drive positive change in the way that migrant workers are recruited. All members of the Leadership Group are publicly committed to the Employer Pays Principle and its implementation throughout their supply chains. 
Seafish Common Ethics Language Group
The Common Ethics Language Group is a multi-stakeholder group established by Seafish whose aims are to establish a common understanding of ethical issues impacting the seafood supply chain, to communicate the work currently going on to address them, and to agree on a clear agenda for future action.
download.jpg
International Labour Organization: Sea Fisheries Project 
 
ILO SEA Fisheries Project aims to reduce human trafficking and labour exploitation in fisheries by strengthening coordination and increase the efficiency and effectiveness of existing national and regional level anti-trafficking efforts in South East Asia. 
The SEA Fisheries Project works on three core areas: establish a multi-stakeholder regional coordination body; coordinate strategies and action plans; commission and conduct independent research.
The Ethical Trading Initiative
 
The Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) is a leading alliance of companies, trade unions and NGOs that promotes respect for workers' rights around the globe. Its vision is a world where all workers are free from exploitation and discrimination, and enjoy conditions of freedom, security and equity. ETI brings corporate, trade union and voluntary sector members together in a unique alliance that enables it to collectively tackle many thorny issues that cannot be addressed by individual companies working alone.
Support public policy change: 
Companies can engage with governments to promote regulations, conventions, and other legal frameworks that protect human and labor rights for workers, including migrant workers. 

Companies can use the U.S. State Department’s Trafficking in Persons Report (TIP) to identify the extent to which governments of the nations they source from are taking action to combat human trafficking. In addition, companies can use the U.S. Department of Labor's List of Goods Produced by Child or Forced Labor to identify products that may have been produced by child or forced labor in violation of international standards. With this information companies can send letters to governments of countries with concerns, requesting that they improve their requirements and enforcement to ensure these conditions do not persist.

 

Currently, fishing vessels are excluded from the majority of international convention provisions that protect workers’ rights. Businesses can use their leverage and influence to drive ratification of the policies and conventions to protect fishers’ working rights below.

In order to encourage policy reform, companies can engage through two primary means:
 
  • Direct government engagement or supply chain improvements - 
    • Government engagement consists of encouraging legal reform directly with a governmental body, typically through through advocacy letters, meetings, or other means.
  • Utilize supply chain improvements -
    • As a greater number of companies implement practices that they hope to be legally required, the barrier for implementing that policy or law may then be lowered.
Screen Shot 2019-01-28 at 9.33.43 PM.png
Screenshot 2019-02-08 18.04.41.png
Verité: Summary of International Social Conventions in Seafood Sector 
 
This tool provides additional guidance to the standards and benchmarks laid out in Tools 1 and 1A, citing instruments such as the United Nations Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (UNCLOS) and the International Labour Organization's Seafarers Identity Documents Convention.